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FLAVORS AND INGREDIENTS
TRADITIONAL AND VEGAN
CREMA DEL NONNO
• Latte fresco
• Zucchero
• Uova fresche da allevamento a terra
FIOR DI PANNA
• Latte fresco
• Panna fresca
• Zucchero
STRACCIATELLA
• Latte fresco
• Panna fresca
• Zucchero
• Goccine di cioccolato
FONDENTE NERO
• Acqua
• Cioccolato fondente
• Zucchero
• Uova
CIOCCOLATO AL LATTE
• Latte fresco
• Panna fresca
• Zucchero
• Cioccolato
CIOCCOLATO BIANCO
• Latte fresco
• Panna fresca
• Zucchero
• Zucchero bianco
GIANDUJA (DUJOT)
• Latte fresco
• Panna fresca
• Cioccolato
• Nocciola Piemonte I.G.P.
NOCCIOLA
• Latte fresco
• Zucchero
• Nocciola Piemonte I.G.P.
PISTACCHIO SICILIA
• Latte scremato
• Sciroppo di zucchero
• Pistacchio Sicilia
VARIEGATO AMARENA
• Latte fresco
• Zucchero
• Amarene
CAFFE'
• Latte fresco
• Panna fresca
• Zucchero
• Caffè
YOGURT
• Yogurt intero
• Latte
• Zucchero
FRAGOLA
• Acqua
• Zucchero
• Fragole Camarosa
LIMONE
• Acqua
• Zucchero
• Succo di limone
MELONE
• Acqua
• Zucchero
• Melone
PESCA GIALLA
• Acqua
• Zucchero
• Pesca gialla
COCCO
• Latte
• Zucchero
• Polpa di cocco
FRUTTO DELLA PASSIONE
• Acqua
• Zucchero
• Frutto della passione 25%
MANDARINO
• Acqua
• Zucchero
• Mandarino tardivo di Ciaculli
MANGO
• Acqua
• Zucchero
• Polpa di mango dell'India
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A HIDDEN TREASURE

ALL ABOUT MY GRANDFATHER

At first, it was a game, a bit of fun. I wanted to turn it all into a book. You don’t hear stories like that every day.

My father, Raimondo, and I would set off with the handful of addresses I’d managed to dig out in the hope of meeting the people who had worked with my grandfather: people in their eighties, nineties and even one man who was over a hundred. It’s true that for 15 years – i.e. since my grandfather, Gabriello, had died – no one had thought of doing it, but I felt that there was now no time to lose.

But first things first: I knew full well that no matter how interesting the story was, writing a book about the gelato company founded by my father’s father was pure utopia. I knew part of the story and I have to thank my dad, who had worked with my grandfather before embarking on a career as a lawyer, for that. Nevertheless, I didn’t have any eyewitness accounts of the very beginning, the founding years. What amazed me most was the lack of records dating from that time, apart from the odd photograph. Had no one in the family kept any?

Then, one morning, dad and I found a key in the country house where my grandmother lived, in Romano Canavese. It was tied to a little medal of St. Anthony of Padua and a small gold crucifix that Gabriello had always worn. That key had been in the kitchen for 15 years: grandma had never managed to find the right lock, despite the fact that she had tried the key in just about every drawer and box. An old-fashioned leather and canvas trunk, with the initials G. C. – Gabriello Cecchi – printed next to the lock, came to mind. The trunk was hidden in the cellar of the house in Romano Canavese. As a boy, I had played in that cellar, a place I called the gun room because my grandfather kept his hunting rifles there.

The chest had a tiny lock and this tiny key opened it. I found the entire history of Gelati Cecchi inside: notes and deeds, as well as handwritten invoices, letters from Teofilo Sanson to my grandfather, photographs, newspaper clippings, a Biella basketball team Gelati Cecchi vest autographed by Rudy Bennett, old enamel notices, advertising sketches, cardboard cups and gelato cone holders. There wasn’t a diary written by my grandfather that could form the basis of a book, but there was much more in that trunk. There were the recipes for the gelati that made the Cecchi name famous: Capriccio, Canestrino, Secchiello, Mattonella, Graziella, Nobilino, Parigina, Canguro, Mela Cha Cha Cha and his legendary Cecchino gelato.

I couldn’t believe it, it was a dream. Even the original formulae for homemade gelato flavours were in there: old-fashioned vanilla, chocolate chip, gianduja chocolate and many more. Only one person in the world has those recipes: a master gelato maker in Turin, famous for the quality of his products. My grandfather had given them to him before switching from homemade gelato to the industry. I could never have asked such a person for those recipes, seeing as how he still follows them to the letter, out of respect.

Now that I have rummaged through the trunk, studied all the photographs, read the notes, letters and recipes, leafed through the albums and old advertisements, only now can I say that I know what there is to know about Gelati Cecchi. Fragments of history that have been a part of my childhood, fragments without a beginning or an end, have found their proper ending and their beginning. Incomplete tales have taken shape and now make sense. Lost objects have turned up in unexpected places. When the whole image emerged, I was amazed because I saw Gabriello, my grandfather, at work, at the helm of his company, as if I’d been there, as if I’d been there, right before my eyes.

It certainly is a shame that I never saw him at his desk, in his avantgarde factory in Vinovo or in the gelato shop where it all began in 2 Corso Palestro; an entrepreneur like him, someone who had travelled from Tuscany to Turin and created one of Italy’s biggest gelato companies, would have had plenty of advice to impart. Fate has appointed me to start over. I haven’t given up the idea of writing a book, but now my main priority is to revive Gelati Cecchi, just as grandad had envisaged them back in 1936, with those recipes and with that history, the history of my family.

Stefano Cecchi

History

The Gelati Cecchi adventure began in 1936, in 2 Corso Palestro, Turin. It was just the beginning of a tale of quality, innovation and love for one’s chosen trade.





In 1936, Gabriello Cecchi moved to Turin. He was originally from Ponte Buggianese, in Tuscany, but he hailed from France, where he had learnt the art of making gelato from Italian immigrants. Assisted by his wife and his brother, Tancredi, he opened an gelato parlour in Corso Palestro with a seating capacity of 200 and a workshop attached. The business grew quickly, thanks also to his famous crema gialla custard flavour, considered the best in Turin at the time. This particular type of vanilla, a flavour that no one ever managed to reproduce, was Gabriello’s jewel in the crown. The glass sign featuring golden italics on an aquamarine background, which dominated the Corso Palestro parlour’s shop window – Cecchi Gelati Naturali – revealed only part of the secret. Gabriello did use top quality ingredients, but it was the formula he used to mix those ingredients that made his gelati so unforgettable. It was a time when gelato was booming; it became a mass consumer good in the postwar years. gelato recipes were perfected and new ways of eating it were invented. The usual steel cups used for serving it at tables were joined by wafer cones for eating it while strolling along. The three most important brands in Turin were Cecchi, Fiorio and Pepino. Then there were those who didn’t have a shop yet and toured the city on a bicycle cart, such as Teofilo Sanson, who sold the gelato his close friend Gabriello provided him with.



At the end of the Second World War – during which Gabriello fought alongside the partisans (he was the commander of the 77th Garibaldi Brigade in Italy and the Third International Brigade in Spain) – Gelati Cecchi made a giant leap towards industrialisation. The gelato parlour in Corso Palestro was no longer big enough for its ambitious founder, who was in no doubt as to the quality of his products and wished to distribute them beyond the borders of Turin. New machines and technologies became available, hence the first production plant in Via Abate Chanoux was set up: an establishment that initially employed 40 people. Gelati Cecchi produced gelato lollies, cones, sandwiches and tubs. The workshop boasted modern pasteurising and freezing equipment supplied by Cecchi’s friends, Bruto and Poerio Carpigiani. A sales network of entrepreneurs was set up, selling and delivering gelato throughout the regions of Piedmont and Liguria. The increase in production was supported by Cecchi’s first simple promotional efforts.




In the Sixties, Gabriello Cecchi streamlined the company’s structure and focused on industry. He opened a new, modern, 3,000-metre production plant in Vinovo. His son Raimondo, fresh out of law school, was now helping him. Gelati Cecchi grew till it employed 300 members of staff and boasted a network of 120 agents who supplied as many as 1,500 points of sale, expanding to cover the whole of northern Italy and part of the French Riviera. The brand was now a market leader and its marketing efforts attempted to find an image that would be more recognisable and up-to-date. This was how Cecchino, the cartoon that helped enliven the company’s message, came about. Cecchino decorated the fridges and enamel boards displayed at the entrance to the shops the company supplied and, next to him, customers found the gelati that had now been given their own special names: Capriccio, Canestrino, Secchiello, Mattonella, Graziella, Nobilino, Parigina, Canguro and Mela Cha Cha Cha. The company’s communication strategy could not fail to feature sport and Gelati Cecchi linked its name to Biella’s basketball team, which competed in the A1 league and boasted talented players of the calibre of Rudy Bennett and Charlie Caglieris. The company once founded by Gabriello – who by now had been made a Cavaliere del Lavoro (a knight of the Italian Order of Merit for Labour) – had thus become one of the ten biggest Italian gelato companies and joined Motta, Alemagna, Besana, Algida, Chiavacci, Sammontana, Toseroni, Sanson and Tanara in setting up a trade association that was presided over by Raimondo Cecchi for a two-year stint. At the height of its success in the early 1970s and during a general phase of corporate take-overs, Gelati Cecchi was acquired by the Barilla Group through its subsidiary, Tanara, only to become part of the Italgel SME Group, alongside Motta and Alemagna.

o Gabriello Cecchi became the director of the Italgel Group, responsible for research and development. In the early 1980s, a new gourmet brand –Antica Gelateria del Corso –was launched, proving a resounding success with consumers from the very start. Gabriello followed this project’s development step by step, creating unforgettable products such as the Cocco Gelato coconut, Gelato lemon and the famous Gelato tartufo (truffle). In 1993, the Italgel Group was sold for 475 billion lira to the Swiss multinational food corporation Nestlé. It was then that the Cecchi family definitively bowed out of the gelato industry, except for Silvano Moschini, the brother of Luisa, Gabriello Cecchi’s wife, who kept the family tradition alive in his gelato parlour in Via Nizza. It is thanks to Silvano that the secret of ‘old-fashioned’ gelato has not been lost, a secret that has earned him international awards and recognition in Italy, in the Gambero Rosso and Slow Food guides.


Stefano Gabriello Cecchi – Raimondo’s son and Gabriello’s grandson, the founder of a record company, a creator of luxury brands and a global marketing and communication consultant – decides to breathe new life into his grandfather’s magic formulas, faithfully reproducing the flavours whilst adapting them to modern-day standards. In this way, Stefano has made them available all over the world, thanks to a preservation technique that only uses cold temperatures. The story began in Turin in 1936 and it was in Turin that it had to start afresh.

FOUR GENERATIONS


 
Raimondo - 1870
A small landowner in Tuscany, Raimondo began experimenting with the basic techniques of cold processing and whipping, which he passed on to his son Gabriello. Some of his inventions are still in use to this day.
 

 
Gabriello - 1914
A Partisan Commander, a Commander Emeritus and Knight of the Order of Merit, he learned the pioneering trade of gelato-making from his father and perfected it in France. He was the great creator and patriarch of the Gelati Cecchi brand from 1936 to 1973 and was undoubtedly the most important exponent of Italy’s gelato industry in the early years after the war. After having sold the company, he remained Honorary Chairman and Director of the Italgel Group and Motta-Nestlé up until the 1990s. During his lifetime, he was awarded the title of Commander of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic, Knight of the Order of Merit for Labour, Commander of Merit of the Military Order of St. Bridget of Sweden and he was also bestowed the Cross of Commandeur de Premiere Classe du Merite of the Belgian Order of the Crown for philanthropy and meritorious acts and the Italian War Merit Cross by the Italian Army following his role as a partisan in the liberation of the city of Turin.
Wikipedia - Gabriello Cecchi
 

 
Raimondo - 1938
A law graduate, Raimondo worked alongside his father during the golden age of Gelati Cecchi’s expansion and mastermind edits sale to Barilla, which acquired the four Italgel brands through its subsidiary Tanara, which were then sold on to Nestlé. For two years, Raimondo was Chairman of the national trade association, whose members included Motta, Alemagna, Besana, Algida, Chiavacci, Sammontana, Toseroni, Sanson and Tanara and was President and sponsor of Gelati Cecchi Biella, the basketball team that played in the A1 series. After Gelati Cecchi was sold in 1973, he ran the San Carlo dept stores in Turin until the 1990s. In 2000, he was appointed President of the Canottieri Esperia 1886 rowing club, a post he held for over a decade, during which he secured the contract to base the Casa Sassonia German athletic club there during the 2006 Winter Olympics from the Olympic committee.
 

 
Stefano - 1971
Stefano attended college in the United States and studied Economics at the University of London, where he resided until the age of 30. An expert in marketing and communication, he resurrected the family brand, Gelati Cecchi 1936, in 2014, the year that marked the 100th anniversary of Sir Gabriello Cecchi’s birth, expanding the company to an international level so as to make his grandfather’s unforgettable flavours and recipes available the world over, using the simple cold processing technique.
Wikipedia - Stefano Cecchi
 







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Contacts

International production - Ho.Re.Ca.(*)


Via Santagata, 50
10156 Torino - Italia

Distribution



Salita S. Caterina 4/6A,
16123 Genova – Italia
www.alifood.it

Trading Office


86 Jermyn Street
London SW1Y6AW
United Kingdom


 

*
OUR PARLOURS
In our gelato parlours, the clean label gelato is made only with Montbéliarde cows milk and with free range eggs and it contains no preservatives whatsoever.
 

THE HoReCa + INTERNATIONAL MARKETS
Gelato produced for the HoReCa (Hotel, Restaurant & Café) and INTERNATIONAL markets is made and shipped by Menodiciotto following specially drafted guidelines and contains no preservatives, using only cold processing techniques for product conservation and transportation.
 




GELATICECCHI(ITA).pdf

Gelati Cecchi - Family History (Download PDF)